The Demography of Race and Ethnicity in Hungary

Part of the International Handbooks of Population book series (IHOP, volume 4)

Abstract

Hungary, located in the middle of Central Europe with a land mass slightly smaller than the state of Virginia, has for over millennia been a point of convergence for multiple cultures, populations and ethnicities. At the same time, the Hungarians, as a people, are unique in Central Europe, originating from the Russian steppes on the border of Europe and Asia, and speaking a language that is distantly related to Finnish, and not at all related to any of the other major European language groups. In relation to its past, present-day Hungary is by most standards an ethnically homogenous country. However, social and political issues related to national and ethnic minorities have played central roles in the country’s formation and development, and continue to fundamentally shape both the character of its civic sphere as well as its national and international policies. We begin this chapter with an historical background to trace the ways in which political and demographic issues associated with national and ethnic minorities have fundamentally shaped Hungary’s past and present. We then focus on contemporary Hungary, paying particular attention to the Roma minority. We conclude with a discussion of what we interpret as the most salient social and demographic trends as well as theoretical and public policy concerns related to minority populations as Hungary moves forward into the twenty-first century.

Keywords

Municipal Government Carpathian Basin National Minority Roma Population Minority Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Education Policy StudiesPenn State UniversityState CollegeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social WorkKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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