Advertisement

Concluding Comments, Recommendations, and Further Considerations

  • Linda M. PhillipsEmail author
  • Stephen P. Norris
  • John S. Macnab
Chapter
  • 969 Downloads
Part of the Models and Modeling in Science Education book series (MMSE, volume 5)

Abstract

We opened this book with the question: Is there a single defensible theoretical model of visualization? The short answer is that there is not, at least not at this time. The current state of research does not point to a single model of visualization but, rather, to partial models. We expect that in the short run educators and researchers should use the available results in contexts similar to those in which they were found, because we do not have theories adequate to the task of determining their generalizability to other situations. First, in this chapter, we review three important distinctions that we have made.

Keywords

Visual Imagery Visual Complexity Dual Code Popular Literature Dual Code Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Reference

  1. Clark, J. M., & Paivio, A. (1991). Dual coding theory and education. Educational Psychology Review, 3(3), 149–210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gill, C. D., Klecan-Aker, J., Roberts, T., & Fredenburg, K. A. (2003). Following directions: Rehearsal and visualization strategies for children with specific language impairment. Child Language Teaching & Therapy, 19(1), 85–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Galton, F. (1880b). Statistics of mental imagery. Mind, 5(19), 301–318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Presmeg, N. C. (1986). Visualisation and mathematical giftedness. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 17(3), 297–311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Vekiri, I. (2002). What is the value of graphical displays in learning? Educational Psychology Review, 14(3), 261–312.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Pylyshyn, Z. W. (2003). Seeing and visualizing: It’s not what you think. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  7. Dwyer, F. M. (1968). When visuals are not the message. Educational Broadcasting Review, 2(5), 38–43.Google Scholar
  8. Lee, H., Plass, J. L., & Homer, B. D. (2006). Optimizing cognitive load for learning from computer-based science simulations. Journal of Educational Psychology, 98(4), 902–913.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Gill, C. D., Klecan-Aker, J., Roberts, T., & Fredenburg, K. A. (2003). Following directions: Rehearsal and visualization strategies for children with specific language impairment. Child Language Teaching & Therapy, 19(1), 85–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Linn, M. C. (2003). Technology and science education: Starting points, research programs, and trends. International Journal of Science Education, 25(6), 727–758.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Levie, W. L., & Lentz, R. (1982). Effects of text illustrations: A review of research. Educational Communication and Technology, 30(4), 195–232.Google Scholar
  12. Cifuentes, L., & Hsieh, Y. J. (2003). Visualization for construction of meaning during study time: A quantitative analysis. International Journal of Instructional Media, 30(3), 263–273.Google Scholar
  13. Gilmartin, P. P. (1982). The instructional efficacy of maps in geographic text. Journal of Geography, 81(4), 145–150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Lee, H., Plass, J. L., & Homer, B. D. (2006). Optimizing cognitive load for learning from computer-based science simulations. Journal of Educational Psychology, 98(4), 902–913.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Aspinwall, L., Shaw, K. L., & Presmeg, N. C. (1997). Uncontrollable mental imagery: Graphical connections between a function and its derivative. Educational Study in Mathematics, 133(3), 301–318.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda M. Phillips
    • 1
    Email author
  • Stephen P. Norris
    • 2
  • John S. Macnab
    • 3
  1. 1.Canadian Centre for Research on LiteracyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Centre for Research in Youth, Science Teaching and LearningUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  3. 3.EdmontonCanada

Personalised recommendations