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Visualizations and Science

  • Linda M. PhillipsEmail author
  • Stephen P. Norris
  • John S. Macnab
Chapter
Part of the Models and Modeling in Science Education book series (MMSE, volume 5)

Abstract

By way of contrast to the situation in mathematics education, there has been a general consensus among researchers during the past 20 years that visualization object s assist in explaining, developing, and learning concepts in the field of science.

Keywords

Methyl Orange Cognitive Load Conceptual Change Polymerase Chain Reaction Method Computer Computer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda M. Phillips
    • 1
    Email author
  • Stephen P. Norris
    • 2
  • John S. Macnab
    • 3
  1. 1.Canadian Centre for Research on LiteracyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Centre for Research in Youth, Science Teaching and LearningUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  3. 3.EdmontonCanada

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