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From Theory to Action: Exploring the Institutional Conditions for Student Retention

  • Vincent Tinto
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 25)

Abstract

Though access to higher education in the United States has increased over the past several decades, similar increases in college completion have not followed suit. Despite years of effort, we have, in large measure, been unable to translate the promise increased access affords to students, in particular those of low-income and underserved backgrounds, into the reality of college completion especially as measured by 4-year degrees. That this is the case is reflective in part of our inability to translate what we have learned from research on student retention into a reasonable set of guidelines for the types of actions and policies institution must put into place to increase rates of college completion.

Keywords

Student Engagement Student Success Institutional Action Academic Support Classroom Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Syracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA

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