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Human Rights, Development INGOs and Priorities for Action

  • Kieran DonaghueEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Library of Ethics and Applied Philosophy book series (LOET, volume 23)

Abstract

International NGOs (INGOs) dedicated to securing the vital interests of vulnerable human beings are commonly divided into: human rights INGOs (e.g. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch); humanitarian/relief organisations (e.g. the International Committee of the Red Cross, Medicins Sans Frontieres); and development INGOs (e.g. Oxfam, World Vision, Plan International, Save the Children Fund, CARE).

Keywords

Development Assistance Physical Security Home Government Moral Weight Human Right Watch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public EthicsAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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