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Introduction: Why Learn About Gender and Sexual Diversity in Schools?

  • Elizabeth J. Meyer
Chapter
Part of the Explorations of Educational Purpose book series (EXEP, volume 10)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the reader to the many issues schools are facing that relate to gender and sexual diversity. This chapter presents a brief overview of some of the main topics including bullying and harassment, diversity and equity, sexual and emotional health, positive school climates, and academic success. It also presents some related educational theories and situates how the theoretical foundations of each argue for inclusive discussions of gender and sexual diversity. The following educational philosophies are introduced: democratic, critical pedagogy, multicultural, social justice, feminist, anti-oppressive, and queer. Finally, the chapter gives examples from the curriculum, extracurricular activities, and school design to show how sexual and gender diversity are already present in schools, but generally not addressed in positive or inclusive ways.

Keywords

Social Justice School Climate Extracurricular Activity Sexual Diversity Democratic Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. of EducationConcordia UniversityMontrealCanada

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