The Paradoxes Revisited: The Chinese Learner in Changing Educational Contexts

Chapter
Part of the CERC Studies in Comparative Education book series (CERC, volume 25)

Abstract

In the introduction to this volume, we highlighted the need to revisit the Chinese learner against the background of socioeconomic and technological changes, shifts in learning paradigms, new educational policies and widespread curriculum reforms. This volume has examined the contemporary Chinese learner of the 21st century considering the changing nature of learning and epistemology, emerging pedagogy and classroom practice, and recent teacher professional development. We also focused on continuity and change in student and teacher learning in the light of traditional cultural beliefs and changing educational contexts.

Keywords

Cultural Belief Chinese Student Educational Reform Educational Context Chinese Learner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of Hong KongHong KongChina

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