Special session of California 2000 field study

Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security book series (NAPSC)

Keywords

Aerosol Optical Depth Secondary Organic Aerosol Volatile Organic Compound Concentration Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Automate Surface Observe System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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References

  1. More information on CCOS and CRAPQS (collectively known as Central California Air Quality Studies) can be found at www.arb.ca.gov/airways/
  2. More information on the MATES series, conducted by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, is found at www.aqmd.gov/news1/2005/matesiiifactsheet.html
  3. More information on ARCTAS, including the California portion, can be found at http://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/arctas/arctas.html
  4. More information on 2010 CalNex project can be found at http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/ fieldstudy2010/fieldstudy2010.htm
  5. Byun, D. and Schere, K.L., Review of the Governing Equations, Computational Algorithms, and Other Components of the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System, Appl. Mech. Rev. 59, 51, 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UCLA Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic SciencesLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.NOAA/ESRL/PSDBoulderUSA
  3. 3.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  4. 4.California Air Resources BoardSacramentoUSA

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