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Microbial Mats pp 585-590 | Cite as

Summary and Conclusions

  • Joseph Seckbach
  • Patrick G. Eriksson
  • Maud M. Walsh
  • Aharon Oren
  • Julian Chela-Flores
Chapter
Part of the Cellular Origin, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology book series (COLE, volume 14)

Abstract

This volume encompasses many aspects of microbial mats. Many of the chapters dealt with their description, their geographical distribution, and their environmental properties. They presented the characteristics of the mats and of the microorganisms of which they are composed. The chapters included descriptions of microbial mats in fresh water, soils, seepages, marine settings, and in hypersaline areas. Among the microorganisms encountered are green algae, diatoms, cyanobacteria, lichens, and many others. Geographical locations included marine settings such as the Baltic Sea, the hypersaline mats of Guerrero Negro, the acidic environment of the Rio Tinto, and the cold Antarctic Dry Valleys. Some chapters discussed the molecular aspects of the mats, their osmotic adaptation, biosignatures, and other properties of the microbial communities. Other chapters dealt with the ancient mats (the paleoenvironment of early Earth), comparing their properties with those of modern mats. Their occurrence in extreme environments could serve as a model for similar structures which might possibly exist in extraterrestrial bodies such as on Europa (satellite of Jupiter), Mars, and other celestial bodies.

Keywords

Shallow Marine Environment Kaapvaal Craton Marine Setting Osmotic Adaptation Freeze Lake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Seckbach
    • 1
  • Patrick G. Eriksson
    • 2
  • Maud M. Walsh
    • 3
  • Aharon Oren
    • 4
  • Julian Chela-Flores
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.The Hebrew University of JerusalemEfratIsrael
  2. 2.Department of GeologyUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  3. 3.School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil SciencesLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  4. 4.Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, The Institute of Life Sciences, and the Moshe Shilo Minerva Center for Marine BiogeochemistryThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael
  5. 5.The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical PhysicsTriesteItaly
  6. 6.Instituto de Estudios AvanzadosVenezuelaRepublica Bolivariana de Venezuela

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