Advertisement

A Rhetoric for Educational Research

  • Lynda StoneEmail author
Chapter
  • 750 Downloads
Part of the Educational Research book series (EDRE, volume 4)

Abstract

In the spirit of rhetoric, this chapter offers a rhetoric for educational research. One direction within which to explore the thematic of this volume on language in education is into the realm of rhetoric. Its tradition within western thought is as old as history; its standard story is not new, although from near-ignominy there is a relatively recent resurgence of interest and scholarship. Also potentially significant is a rhetorical orientation toward contemporary educational theory, specifically applicable to educational research explored herein. The chapter is organized into two parts. The first part, background, provides framing for the second, more developed part, exemplar. Following introduction, sections of part one overview two conceptions of rhetoric, the first named “extension” as a general orientation toward inquiry and the second named “tradition” as a brief history of the classical formulation. A brief section makes connection to philosophy of education. Sections of part two begin with consideration of educational research and to rhetoric of science. Then the concept of ethos is overviewed as a lead into a special contribution from the late American literary theorist, Wayne Booth (whose work is referenced throughout). The last substantive section applies Booth’s concept of the implied author – and its ethos – to an exemplary document from educational research.

Keywords

Educational Research Western Thought Figurative Language Standard Story Classical Rhetoric 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This chapter is a revision of a paper delivered at the meeting of the Research Community, Fund of Scientific Research-Vlaanderen. Philosophy and History of the Discipline of Education, Evaluation and Evolution of the Criteria for Educational Research, Leuven, Belgium, May, 2008. Thanks to participants for stimulating questions especially to David Bridges who rightly asked for clarification.

References

  1. American Educational Research Association. (2007/2008). Standards for reporting on empirical social science research on AERA publications. Retrieved April, 2008, from http://www.aera.net/uploadedFiles/Opportunities/StandardsforReportingEmpiricalSocialScience_PDF.pdf
  2. Antczak, F. (1979). Thought and character: The rhetoric of democratic education. Ames, IO: Iowa State University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Antczak, F. (1995a). Introduction. Rhetoric and pluralism: Legacies of Wayne Booth. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Antczak, F. (Ed.). (1995b). Rhetoric and pluralism: Legacies of Wayne Booth. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Barthes, R. (1967/1977/1978). The death of the author. In Image-music-text (pp. 142–148). New York: Hill and Wang.Google Scholar
  6. Biagioli, M. (1999). Introduction: Science studies and its disciplinary predicament. In M. Biagioli (Ed.), The science studies reader (pp. xi–xviii). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Booth, W. (1961/1983). The rhetoric of fiction. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  8. Booth, W. (1983). Afterward to the second edition: The rhetoric in fiction and fiction as rhetoric: Twenty one years later. In The rhetoric of fiction (2nd ed., pp. 400–457). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  9. Booth, W. (1988). The company we keep: An ethics of fiction. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  10. Booth, W. (2004a). My life with rhetoric: From neglect to obsession. In W. Jost & W. Olmsted (Eds.), A companion to rhetoric and rhetorical criticism (pp. 494–504). Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  11. Booth, W. (2004b). The rhetoric of rhetoric: The quest for effective communication. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  12. Booth, W. (2004/2006). Rhetoric, science, religion. In W. Jost (Ed.), The essential Wayne Booth (pp. 264–278). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  13. Booth, W. (2006). The essential Wayne Booth (W. Jost, Ed.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  14. Brazerman, C. (1987). Codifying the social scientific style: The APA publication manual as a behaviorist rhetoric. In J. Nelson, A. Megill, & D. McCloskey (Eds.), The rhetoric of the human sciences: Language, argument and scholarship in public affairs (pp. 125–144). Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  15. Bridges, D. & Smith, R. (Eds.). (2007). Philosophy, methodology, and educational research. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  16. Crosswhite, J. (2004). Rhetoric in the wilderness: The deep rhetoric of the late twentieth century. In W. Jost & W. Olmsted (Eds.), A companion to rhetoric and rhetorical criticism (pp. 372–388). Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  17. Donahue, P., & Quandahl, E. (Eds.). (1989). Reclaiming pedagogy: The rhetoric of the classroom. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Edwards, R., Nicoll, K., Solomon, N., & Usher, R. (2004). Rhetoric and educational discourse: Persuasive texts? London: RoutledgeFalmer.Google Scholar
  19. Fish, S. (1990/1995). Rhetoric. In F. Lenricchia & T. McLaughlin (Eds.), Critical terms for literary study (2nd ed., p. 222). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  20. Frogel, S. (2005). The rhetoric of philosophy. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
  21. Gaonkar, D. (1997). The idea of rhetoric in the rhetoric of science. In A. Gross & W. Keith (Eds.), Rhetorical hermeneutics: Invention and interpretation in the age of science (pp. 25–88). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
  22. Gross, A. (1990). The rhetoric of science. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Gross, A. (2006). Starring the text: The place of rhetoric in science studies. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Haraway, D. (1991). Simians, cyborgs and women: The reinvention of nature. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  25. Hernadi, P. (1987). Literary interpretation and the rhetoric of the human sciences. In J. Nelson, A. Megill, & D. McCloskey (Eds.), The rhetoric of the human sciences: Language, argument and scholarship in public affairs (pp. 263–275). Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  26. Hernadi, P. (Ed.). (1989). The rhetoric of interpretation and the interpretation of rhetoric. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Herrick, J. (1997/2005). A history and theory of rhetoric (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson Education.Google Scholar
  28. Jasinski, J. (2001). Ethos. In Sourcebook on rhetoric: Key concepts contemporary rhetorical studies (pp. 229–234). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  29. Jost, W. (2006). Introduction. In The essential Wayne Booth (pp. 1–20). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  30. Jost, W., & Olmsted, W. (Eds.). (2004). A companion to rhetoric and rhetorical criticism. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  31. Kennedy, G. (1963). The art of persuasion in ancient Greece. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  32. Kennedy, G. (1998). Comparative rhetoric: An historical and cross-cultural introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Kuhn, T. (1970). The structure of scientific revolutions (2nd ed.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  34. Merton, R. (1973). The normative structure of science. In N. Storer (Ed.), The sociology of science: Theoretical and empirical investigations (pp. 267–278). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  35. Miller, A. (2007). Rhetoric, paideia, and the old idea of a liberal education. Journal of Philosophy of Education, 41(2), 183–206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Mitroff, I., & Mason, R. (1981). Creating a dialectical social science: Concepts, models and methods. Dordrecht: Reidel.Google Scholar
  37. Nelson, J., Megill, A., & McCloskey, D. (1987a). Rhetoric of inquiry. In J. Nelson, A. Megill, D. McCloskey (Eds.), The rhetoric of the human sciences: Language, argument and scholarship in public affairs (pp. 3–18). Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  38. Nelson, J., Megill, A., & McCloskey, D. (Eds.). (1987b). The rhetoric of the human sciences: Language, argument and scholarship in public affairs (pp. 3–18). Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  39. Olmsted, W. (2006). Rhetoric: An historical introduction. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  40. Perelman, C., & Olbrechts-Tyteca, L. (1958/1969). The new rhetoric: A treatise in argumentation (J. Wilkinson & P. Weaver, Trans.). Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame University Press.Google Scholar
  41. Phillips, D. (2005). The contested nature of empirical educational research (and why philosophy of education offers little help). Journal of Philosophy of Education, 39(4), 577–597.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Polkinghorne, D. (1997). Reporting qualitative research as practice. In W. Tierney & Y. Lincoln (Eds.), Representation and the text: Re-framing the narrative voice (pp. 3–21). New York: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
  43. Prelli, L. (1989a). A rhetoric of science: Inventing scientific discourse. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press.Google Scholar
  44. Prelli, L. (1989b). The rhetorical construction of scientific discourse. In H. Simons (Ed.), Rhetoric in the human sciences (pp. 48–68). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  45. Professor Wayne Booth. (2005, October 14). TimesOnLine. Retrieved May, 2008, from http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/obituaries/article578209.ece
  46. Reynolds, N. (1993). Ethos as location: New sites for understanding discursive authority. Rhetoric Review, 11(2), 325–338.Google Scholar
  47. Richards, J. (2008). Rhetoric. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  48. Rorty, R. (1987). Science as solidarity. In J. Nelson, A. Megill, & D. McCloskey (Eds.), The rhetoric of the human sciences: Language, argument and scholarship in public affairs (pp. 38–52). Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  49. Simons, H. (Ed.). (1989). Rhetoric in the human sciences. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  50. Smeyers, P., & Depaepe, M. (Eds.). (2003). Beyond empiricism: On criteria for educational research. Leuven: Leuven University Press.Google Scholar
  51. Smeyers, P.,, & Depaepe, M. (Eds.). (2006). Educational research: Why ‘what works’ doesn’t work. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  52. Stone, L. (1996). A rhetorical revolution for philosophy of education. In F. Margonis (Ed.), Philosophy of education: 1996 (pp. 412–420). Urbana: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Philosophy of Education Society.Google Scholar
  53. Toulmin, S. (1958). The uses of argument. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  54. Toulmin, S. (1990). Cosmopolis: The hidden agenda of modernity. New York: The Free Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Education, University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

Personalised recommendations