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Lenses for Understanding Environmental Learning

  • Mark RickinsonEmail author
  • Cecilia Lundholm
  • Nick Hopwood
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces the idea of lenses – interpretive tools or heuristic devices which lead us to look at or for different aspects of environmental learning and thus reach qualitatively different understandings. It also outlines the three lenses that we have developed and which we apply in subsequent chapters to make sense of empirical data across a range of formal learning settings. We begin by explaining what we mean when we use the word lens, and this is followed by a hypothetical environmental learning scenario used to illustrate the different lines of enquiry framed by each lens. We then explain their origins, provide a rationale for their importance, and conclude with a schematic representation and summary.

Keywords

Environmental Learning Environmental Education Epistemological Belief Formal Context Socio Scientific Issue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Rickinson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Cecilia Lundholm
    • 2
  • Nick Hopwood
    • 3
  1. 1.Oxford University and Policy Studies InstituteWallingfordUK
  2. 2.Department of Education and Stockholm Resilience CentreStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Centre for Excellence in Preparing for Academic PracticeOxford Learning InstituteOxfordUK

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