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The Basilica of Maxentius and Its Construction Materials

  • Carlo Giavarini

Abstract

It is well known that Roman basilicas served various public and administrative functions. The construction of the Basilica Nova, now known as the Basilica of Maxentius, was emblematic within the building programme of the emperor Maxentius (306–312 A.C.). Typologically, the building exploited several characteristics of Roman architecture (bath buildings, basilica halls, etc.), reinterpreting and combining them in a successful and original structural whole. The enormous potential offered by the extreme sophistication of Roman imperial building techniques was exploited to create the largest building covered with a system of vaults in the entire empire. The dimensions of the Basilica were 90 × 65 m (about 6,000 m 2 ), with the central nave alone occupying 83 × 25 m.

Keywords

Calcium Carbonate Construction Material Gypsum Content Lime Mortar Wooden Mould 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Giavarini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials & Environment, CISTeC, Research Centre of Science and Technology for Cultural Heritage ConservationUniversity of Rome “La Sapienza”RomaItaly

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