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Phenomenology and Cognitive Linguistics

  • Jordan Zlatev
Chapter

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe some similarities, as well as differences, between theoretical proposals emanating from the tradition of phenomenology and the currently popular approach to language and cognition known as cognitive linguistics (hence CL). This is a rather demanding and potentially controversial topic. For one thing, neither CL nor phenomenology constitute monolithic theories, and are actually rife with internal controversies. This forces me to make certain “schematizations”, since it is impossible to deal with the complexity of these debates in the space here allotted.

Keywords

Image Schema Phenomenological Analysis Natural Attitude Shared Meaning Conceptual Metaphor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would wish to express my gratitude to Göran Sonesson, Esa Itkonen, Chris Sinha, the editors of this Handbook and an anonymous reviewer, whose comments on an earlier version helped improve the text considerably.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jordan Zlatev
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Cognitive Semiotics, SOLLund UniversityLundSweden

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