Ecological Design And Retrieving The Environmental Meaning

  • Hande Gültekın
Part of the Analecta Husserliana book series (ANHU, volume 101)

Abstract

Ecological design can be defined as any form of design that minimizes the environmentally destructive impacts by integrating itself with living processes, nature’s own flows, cycles, and patterns. Ecological wisdom or patterns of awareness pertaining to nature is inherent in the traditional settlement forms, which are the practices of traditional cultures and indigenous knowledge systems. In contemporary setting, engineering, architecture, and other design disciplines are split from the local knowledge systems. As knowledge of place or local knowledge is the starting point for ecological design, it requires an activity of searching for patterns of awareness and retrieving the meaning of traditional settlement forms.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hande Gültekın

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