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Follow-up of Patients with Resistant Hypertension

  • Manolis S. Kallistratos
  • Antonios N. Pavlidis
  • Athanasios J. Manolis
Chapter

Abstract

Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as failure to reach goal blood pressure (BP) in spite of concurrent treatment with maximum tolerated doses of three antihypertensive agents of different classes, including a diuretic. Several trials have demonstrated that achievement of BP goals is still poor despite the use of several protocol-defined treatment regimens. Follow-up of these patients seems to be even more difficult since there are practically no data regarding long-term surveillance of patients with RH. This article provides an overview on the assessment and follow-up of patients with resistant hypertension.

Keywords

Resistant hypertension Refractory hypertension  Blood pressure  Surveillance  Follow-up 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manolis S. Kallistratos
    • 1
  • Antonios N. Pavlidis
    • 2
  • Athanasios J. Manolis
    • 1
  1. 1.Cardiology Department of Asklepeion General HospitalAthensGreece
  2. 2.Cardiology DepartmentSt Thomas’ HospitalLondonUK

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