Advertisement

Il ginseng pp 95-110 | Cite as

Il ruolo del ginseng nell’ambito delle droghe adattogene. Uso in fitoterapia occidentale

  • Paul Goetz

Riassunto

Sia riprendendo la concezione tradizionale asiatica, secondo la quale il ginseng è innanzitutto una droga ricostituente, sia leggendo i risultati delle ricerche e degli esperimenti moderni, il ginseng si comporta terapeuticamente come una droga adattogena. La fama del ginseng e il fatto stesso che il ginseng diventi un riferimento linguistico per un certo numero di droghe medicinali, dimostrano che bisogna interrogarsi su questo concetto.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliografia

  1. 1.
    Welch WH (1901) Adaptation in Pathological Processes, Trans ... 185, and 1901, XXXVII, p.1Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Selye J (1931) Le stress de la vie, le problème de l’adaptation, Les Essais, Paris-Publié par Gallimard, 1975Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lazarev NV (1947) 7th All-Union Congress of Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Medgiz, Moscou, p. 579Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Brekhman II, Dardymov IV (1969) New Substances of Plant Origin which Increase Nonspecific Resistance. Annual Review of Pharmacology, v.9.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Khare CP (2004) Indian Herbal Remedies. Rational Western Therapy and Other Traditional Usage, Botany. With 255 Figures, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, p. 89Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Capasso F, Gaginella T, Grandolini G, Izzo A (1990) Phytotherapy, A quick reference to herbal medicine, Springer-Verlag, p.197Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Capasso F, Gaginella T, Grandolini G, Izzo A (1990) Phytotherapy, A quick reference to herbal medicine, Springer-Verlag, p.378Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Asano K, Takahashi T, Miyashita M et al. (1986) Effect of Eleutherococcus senticosus extract on human physical workinc capacity, Planta Med, 175–176Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Stephan H, Jousselin E, Questel R, Lecomte A (1984) Expérimentation de l’éleuthérocoque en athlétisme au cours d’un cycle d’entraînement à dominante aérobie, Cinésiologie, 23, 97–103Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Yun-Choi HS, Kim JH, Lee JR (1987) Potential inhibitors of platelet aggregation from plant sources, III. J Nat Prod, 50(6), 1059–64PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Maslov LN, Guzarova NV (2008) Cardioprotective and antiarrhythmic properties of preparations from Leuzea carthamoides, Aralia mandshurica, and Eleutherococcus senticosus, Eksp Klin Farmakol, (6), 48–54Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Lutomski J, Gorecki P, Haasa J (1981) Immunologische Eigenschaften der Saponosidfraktion aus Aralia mandshurica, Planta Med, 42(6), 116–117PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Abidov MT, del Rio MJ, Ramazanov TZ et al. (2006) Effects of Aralia mandshurica and Engelhardtia chrysolepis extracts on some parameters of lipid metabolism in women with nondiabetic obesity, Bull Exp Biol Med, 141(3), 343–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Paramonova MS, Gagarinova VM, Rodina MA et al. (1994) The biological activity of saparal in an influenzal infection, Vopr Virusol, 39(3), 131–4PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Azimov MI, Krakovski ME, Ashirmerov AKh (1991) The use of benzonal and saparal in the combined therapy of patients with acute inflammatory processes of the maxillofacial area, Stomatologiia (Mosk), (5), 47–9Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Vereshchagin IA, Koliagina NT, Bobrovitskaia AI (1989) Immunity in children having had viral hepatitis A and been treated with various immunomodulators in the acute period, Vrach Delo, (3), 118–20PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Hocking GM (1997) A dictionary of natural products: terms in the field of pharmacognosy relating to natural medicinal and pharmaceutical materials and the plants, animals, and minerals from which they are derived, Plexus Pub, p.64Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Khare CP (2004) Indian Herbal Remedies. Rational Western Therapy and Other Traditional Usage, Botany, With 255 Figures, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, p.480–483Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Capasso F, Gaginella T, Grandolini G, Izzo A (1990) Phytotherapy, A quick reference to herbal medicine, Springer-Verlag, p.195Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Ramawat KG (2008) Herbal Drugs: Ethnomedicine to Modern Medicine, Springer-Verlag, p.256Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Wagner H (1999) Immunomodulatory Agents from Plants, Birkhauser Verlag AG, 340Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Duke JA (1997) The green pharmacy: new discoveries in herbal remedies for common diseases and conditions from the world’s foremost authority on healing herbs, Rodale, p.121Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Gupta SK (2001) Pharmacology and Therapeutics in the New Millennium. Publié par Springer, 353Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Khare CP (2004) Indian Herbal Remedies. Rational Western Therapy and Other Traditional Usage, Botany, With 255 Figures, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, p.86Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Huang KC, Williams WM (1999) The Pharmacology of Chinese Herbs: Second Edition, CRC Press, p.255Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Capasso F, Gaginella T, Grandolini G, Izzo A (1990) Phytotherapy, A quick reference to herbal medicine, Springer Verlag, p.226Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Baltayev UA, Dinan L, Girault JP, Lafont R (1997) 24(24(1))[Z]-dehydroamarasterone B, a phytoecdysteroid from seeds of Leuzea carthamoide, Phytochemistry, 1, 103–5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Miro M (1995) Cucurbitacins and their pharmacological effects, Phytotherapy research, 9, 159–168CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Mkrtchian LN (1992) Some applied aspects of application of Loshtak in oncology, Symposium paper of the 1st Republican Conference of Traditional medicine, Erivan, 52–53Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Capasso F, Gaginella T, Grandolini G, Izzo A (1990) Phytotherapy, A quick reference to herbal medicine. Springer-Verlag, p.220Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Kim H (2008) in Ramawat KG (2008) Herbal Drugs: Ethnomedicine to Modern Medicine, Springer-Verlag, p.307Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    De Oliveira, F ( 1986) »Pfaffia paniculata (Martius) Kuntze — Brazilian ginseng.« Rev. Bras. Farmacog. 1(1) 86–92CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Lorenzi H, Abreau Matos FJ (2002) Plantas Medicinais no brasil, nativas e exoticas, Instituto Plantarum de Estados da Flora Ltda, p.45Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Puri HS (2003) Rasayana: Ayurvedic Herbs for Longevity and Rejuvenation, CRC Press, 272Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Wagner, H, Nörr, H, Winterhoff, H (1992) Drogen mit »Adaptogenwirkung« zur Stärkung der Widerstandskräfte, Z. Phytother, 13, No. 2, 42–54Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Khare CP (2007) Indian Medicinal Plants: An Illustrated Dictionary, Springer-Verlag, p.445Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Fuwa T, Tani T (2006) Crude drugs for curing internal injury (NeiShang) caused by improper diet or fatigue in »NeiWaiShangBianHuoLun« and »PiWeiLun«, Yakushigaku Zasshin, 41(1), 1–8Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Wang J, He QY (2008) Laws of syndrome element combination in stable angina pectoris: a study based on cluster analysis and corresponding-correlation analysis, Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao, 6(7), 690–694PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Goetz

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations