Modelling Aspects of Longitudinal Control in an Integrated Driver Model

Detection and Prediction of Forced Decisions and Visual Attention Allocation at Varying Event Frequencies
  • Bertram Wortelen
  • Malte Zilinski
  • Martin Baumann
  • Elke Muhrer
  • Mark Vollrath
  • Mark Eilers
  • Andreas Lüdtke
  • Claus Möbus
Conference paper

Abstract

Simulating and predicting behaviour of human drivers with Digital Human Driver Models (DHDMs) has the potential to support designers of new (partially autonomous) driver assistance systems (PADAS) in early stages with regard to understanding how assistance systems affect human driving behaviour. This paper presents the current research on an integrated driver model under development at OFFIS within the EU project ISi-PADAS. We will briefly show how we integrate improvements into CASCaS, a cognitive architecture used as framework for the different partial models which form the integrated driver model. Current research on the driver model concentrates on two aspects of longitudinal control (behaviour a signalized intersections and allocation of visual attention during car following). Each aspect is covered by a dedicated experimental scenario. We show how experimental results guide the modelling process.

Keywords

Driver model Behaviour Classification Attention allocation Car following Traffic light 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 218552, Project ISi-PADAS.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia Srl 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bertram Wortelen
    • 1
  • Malte Zilinski
    • 1
  • Martin Baumann
    • 2
  • Elke Muhrer
    • 4
  • Mark Vollrath
    • 4
  • Mark Eilers
    • 1
  • Andreas Lüdtke
    • 1
  • Claus Möbus
    • 3
  1. 1.OFFIS e.V.–Institute for Information TechnologyOldenburgGermany
  2. 2.DLR German Aerospace Center–Institute of Transportation SystemsBraunschweigGermany
  3. 3.Carl von Ossietzky Universität OldenburgOldenburgGermany
  4. 4.Department of Traffic and Engineering PsychologyTechnische Universität BraunschweigBraunschweigGermany

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