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Vector Control: Need for an Integrated and Eco-based Approach

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Abstract

Vector-borne diseases prevalent in India are briefly mentioned. Malaria remains the major topic of discussion. Distribution of mosquitoes and their sibling species that transmit malaria in India is mentioned. Inter alia malaria is an important communicable disease, and vast lands remained uncultivated due to ravages of malaria. Drainage remains the main strategy of successful malaria control as in Pontine marshes, Panama canal, Tennessee valley and in many other places in the world. Vast wastelands preventing settlements due to ravages of malaria have been converted to granaries of India as in UP Terai. Malaria vectors breed in a variety of water bodies and establish ecotypes as irrigated lands (vector An. culicifacies), urban areas (vector An. stephensi), forests (vectors An. minimus, An. baimaii), slow-running streams (vector An. fluviatilis and An. minimus), brackish water (vector An. sundaicus), etc. Since water is an essential requirement of vectors, it is imperative that water is stored in well-protected places to prevent vector breeding; waste water is safely drained and not allowed to stagnate. The paper describes various malaria ecotypes and how these ecotypes were manipulated to control malaria.

Keywords

  • Vector-borne diseases
  • Vector control
  • Integrated control
  • Link to water
  • Ecotypes
  • Health impact assessment

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Fig. 15.2

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Correspondence to Vinod Prakash Sharma .

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Sharma, V.P. (2017). Vector Control: Need for an Integrated and Eco-based Approach. In: Nath, K., Sharma, V. (eds) Water and Sanitation in the New Millennium. Springer, New Delhi. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-81-322-3745-7_15

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