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Formulations of Biofertilizers – Approaches and Advances

Abstract

The use of microorganisms in agriculture as bioinoculant is a very important practice and a growing need too. In spite of countless research, the rate of success is remarkably low. To get success, there is a need to examine this aspect from various differ angles apart from conventional approaches. This chapter focuses on a few of these aspects of biofertilizer formulations, along with current approaches, and discusses the ideal bioformulation; the present scenario of solid-carrier-based bioformulations; liquid inoculants and their benefits; polymer entrapped formulation and its slow releasing quality; advances in formulations: fluid bed dried bioformulation technique and its scope; forms of mycorrhizal inoculants; bottlenecks which prevent from realization of inoculant potential; major factor for the failure of bioinoculant: rhizocompetence; different forms and their role in the success of bioinoculant, and an outlook for furtherance of biofertilizer formulation. The chapter set sights on the present scenario of biofertilizer formulation, pros and cons of on-hand techniques, and latitude of advancement.

Keywords

  • Microorganisms
  • Biofertilizers
  • Bioinoculants
  • Mycorrhiza
  • Rhizocompetence

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Sahu, P.K., Brahmaprakash, G.P. (2016). Formulations of Biofertilizers – Approaches and Advances. In: Singh, D., Singh, H., Prabha, R. (eds) Microbial Inoculants in Sustainable Agricultural Productivity. Springer, New Delhi. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-81-322-2644-4_12

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