Wheeled Patient Monitoring System

  • Rajesh Kannan Megalingam
  • Pranav Sreedharan Veliyara
  • Raghavendra Murali Prabhu
  • Rithun Raj Krishna
  • Rocky Katoch
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 308)

Abstract

The most common and serious problem that the elderly suffers due to old age is their degrading health conditions that restrict their ability to perform life activities. Most of them require wheelchair to move even within their residence. According to WHO, there are about 1 % of world population that require wheelchair for mobility. People with debility in moving from one location to another are either bedridden or depend upon the wheelchair. An elder, dependent on wheelchair, often requires regular health check-up to keep track of their health status, and it is very difficult for them to have frequent visits to hospitals. Wheeled patient monitoring system (WPMS), in such a situation, is a system that continuously monitors the health condition of the patient by measuring body temperature, blood oxygen saturation in blood and heart rate. These three parameters are the crucial parameters of a body and help the doctor to diagnose easily. WPMS constantly monitors health parameters and identifies critical situations to inform physicians and healthcare centres so that the users are taken care at the earliest. The system can be easily attached to or detached from the wheel chair. WPMS can also be used by patients at hospitals.

Keywords

Wheelchair Temperature SpO2 ECG Pulse oximetry 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are really grateful to HuTLabs, Electronics and Communication department of Amrita School of Engineering, Amritapuri Campus, Kollam, India, for providing us all the necessary laboratory facilities and support towards the successful completion of the project. We also thank the IEEE and Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University for funding this project.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rajesh Kannan Megalingam
    • 1
  • Pranav Sreedharan Veliyara
    • 1
  • Raghavendra Murali Prabhu
    • 1
  • Rithun Raj Krishna
    • 1
  • Rocky Katoch
    • 1
  1. 1.Amrita School of EngineeringAmrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham UniversityKollamIndia

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