Retracted Chapter: Development of Magnetic Control System for Electric Wheel Chair Using Tongue

  • G. Hari Krishnan
  • R. J. Hemalatha
  • G. Umashankar
  • Nilofer Ahmed
  • Soumya Ranjan Nayak
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 308)

Abstract

The current status of disability in world shows that there are lots of people with some kind of disability, according to a census conducted in 2010 by the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI) an interesting fact is that the motor disability is the most common among the various disabilities of the population. People who have paralysis which is the motor disability cannot be able to move by themselves, their opportunities to socialize and get a job are reduced drastically, causing patients to fall into depression, isolation, and anxiety. A useful tool for those who can move their upper limbs are the mechanical or electric wheelchairs, since it is a way to recover part of their mobility, but to use it properly; users must acquire skills and knowledge through a program training, which leads patients to finally accept their disability. But in this project, we have to use one of the human organs which never get paralyzed so that the patients just have to move their tongue inside the mouth in order to move in specified direction. The design which implement this task consists of PIC microcontroller and accelerometer which produces 3 axes as x, y, and z which helps in identifying the direction in which the wheelchair has to be moved. The accelerometer is placed on both the sides of the cheeks and depending on the movement of the tongue, the wheel chair moves in four directions that are forward, backward, left, and right.

Keywords

Magnetic control Wheelchair Tongue H-bridge driver MEMS Microcontroller 

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Hari Krishnan
    • 1
  • R. J. Hemalatha
    • 1
  • G. Umashankar
    • 1
  • Nilofer Ahmed
    • 1
  • Soumya Ranjan Nayak
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical EngineeringSathyabama UniversityChennaiIndia

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