Sound- and Touch-Based Smart Cane: Better Walking Experience for Visually Challenged

  • Rajesh Kannan Megalingam
  • Aparna Nambissan
  • Anu Thambi
  • Anjali Gopinath
  • Megha K. 
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 308)

Abstract

Moving with the help of a white cane is an elusive task for the visually challenged unless they create a mental route map with recognizable reference elements. The Smart Cane is intended to provide the visually challenged a better walking experience. The design is incorporated with Bluetooth-enabled obstacle detection module, supported with heat detection and haptic modules. The ultrasonic range finders help in detecting obstacles. The calculated distance is send to an android device via Bluetooth. The user gets voice alerts about the distance through Bluetooth headset. Haptics module is designed to warn the user of moving obstacles with the help of vibratory motors. The goal of this project is to arm its wielder with the functional support of a walking cane without having to possess one physically.

Keywords

Ultrasonic range finder Haptics Bluetooth 

Notes

Acknowledgment

We are extremely grateful to Electronics and Communication department of Amrita School of Engineering, Amritapuri Campus, Kollam, India, for providing us all the necessary laboratory facilities and support towards the successful completion of the project. We also thank the Amrita Research Laboratory and CAE Laboratory for their support and guidance.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rajesh Kannan Megalingam
    • 1
  • Aparna Nambissan
    • 1
  • Anu Thambi
    • 1
  • Anjali Gopinath
    • 1
  • Megha K. 
    • 1
  1. 1.Amrita School of EngineeringAmrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham UniversityKollamIndia

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