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Political Dynamics in Eurasia: Background and Context of the Turkish Model

Chapter

Abstract

Chapter 1 argues that the Turkish Model was a myth that transferred the ideal of a “secular, democratic, liberal society” as a model for the post-Soviet Turkic world and in the process encouraged a “Turkic” rhetoric that emphasized connection between the two regions based on common ancestry. It examines the inherent paradox in the model and argues that a linear understanding of the model fails to take note of the fact that historically the Turkic connection has assumed relevance at certain junctures and has subsequently been relegated to the background with the recognition of significant differences in the “Turkic” world. However, it remains a useful alternative strategy that is put forward both by Turkey herself and by Western powers as a counterbalance to policy initiatives that are considered detrimental to the maintenance of the status quo in the region.

Keywords

Turkish model Geopolitics European Union Energy and pipelines Eurasianism Turkic rhetoric Gezi Park 

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Copyright information

© Maulana Abul Kalam Azad Institute of Asian Studies (MAKAIAS) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Maulana Abul Kalam Azad Institute of Asian StudiesKolkataIndia

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