Regional Planning and Local Governance: The Portland Story

  • Ethan Paul Seltzer
Part of the cSUR-UT Series: Library for Sustainable Urban Regeneration book series (LSUR, volume 7)

Abstract

The Portland, Oregon, metropolitan region has acquired an international reputation for regional planning and governance. Planners, designers, and civic leaders from around the world have visited the Portland region as a means for gathering information about what it means to plan and govern at a metropolitan scale. Why this interest in regional planning and governance? Why Portland?

Keywords

Urban Growth Regional Planning Metropolitan Region Local Governance Comprehensive Plan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ethan Paul Seltzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Toulan School of Urban Studies and PlanningPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA

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