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Hydrocephalus pp 107-120 | Cite as

Effects of Ventricular Enlargement of Experimental Hydrocephalus on the Regional Cerebral Blood Flow, Somatosensory Evoked Potentials, and Biomechanical Factors

  • Joon Ki Kang
  • Il Woo Lee
  • Chun Kun Park
  • Moon Chan Kim
  • Dal Soo Kim
  • Dae Jo Kim
  • Chang Rak Choi

Summary

This study was designed to determine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), pressure volume index (PVI), and resistance to absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (Ro) in different stages of kaolin-induced hydrocephalus. The experimental animals (cats) were divided into 2 groups; a normal control, and a kaolin-induced hydrocephalic group.

The kaolin-induced hydrocephalic group was divided into 5 subgroups of 10 cats each. These subgroups consisted of cats at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after intracisternal injection of kaolin. Significant decreases in rCBF were revealed both in the frontal cortex and in the periventricular area of kaolin-induced hydrocephalic cats. A reduction of rCBF to 24.7% of control flow (20.4 ± 2.8 ml per 100g per min) was detected in the right periventricular area at 2 weeks after kaolin injection. Changes of amplitude and latency in SEPs were more prominent 4 weeks after kaolin injection. The PVI increased significantly from 0.77 ± 0.02 ml to 1.60 ± 0.16 ml at 4 weeks after kaolin injection. Ro decreased significantly from 90.6 ± 1.3 mmHg per ml per min to 36.8 ± 4.3 mmHg per ml per min at 4 weeks after kaolin injection. It is assumed that some microcirculatory impairment in the brain parenchyma plays an important role which facilitates ventricular expansion with changes of the biomechanical properties of the brain.

Keywords

Biomechanical factors Regional cerebral blood flow Somatosensory evoked potentials Hydrocephalus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Ki Kang
    • 1
  • Il Woo Lee
    • 1
  • Chun Kun Park
    • 1
  • Moon Chan Kim
    • 1
  • Dal Soo Kim
    • 1
  • Dae Jo Kim
    • 1
  • Chang Rak Choi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryKangnam St. Mary’s Hospital, Catholic University Medical CollegeSeoulKorea

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