Relationship Between Posture and Myopia Among Students

  • Tatsuya Marumoto
  • Midori Sotoyama
  • Maria Beatriz G. Villanueva
  • Hiroshi Jonai
  • Hiroto Yamada
  • Atsushi Kanai
  • Susumu Saito

Summary

The purpose of this study was to determine the posture of young students while studying and its relation to the degradation of unaided vision. The subjects were 19 young students (mean age, 13.2 ± 2.2 years). Quantitative analysis of posture while studying was done, and comparison was made with visual functions. The subjects’ posture was monitored from front and lateral views using a video camera. Measurements were made of viewing distance, neck angle, vertical gaze direction, and viewing angle by frame analysis of the video images. There was a significant relation between the viewing distance and eye accommodation, near point, viewing angle, and neck angle (P < 0.01). It was concluded that poor posture, especially decreased neck angle, has a significant relation to the degradation of unaided vision.

Key Words

Posture Viewing distance Neck angle Accommodation Myopia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatsuya Marumoto
    • 1
  • Midori Sotoyama
    • 2
  • Maria Beatriz G. Villanueva
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Jonai
    • 2
  • Hiroto Yamada
    • 3
  • Atsushi Kanai
    • 1
  • Susumu Saito
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyJuntendo University School of MedicineBunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan
  2. 2.National Institute of Industrial HealthTama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214Japan
  3. 3.Department of OphthalmologyYokohama National Hospital 252Totsuka-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 245Japan

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