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Experimental Psychology Approaches to Human Memory

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Memory in a Social Context

Abstract

This chapter describes the experimental approaches to human memory in cognitive psychology. To date, various research methods have been developed and refined to investigate issues of human memory. These efforts have included various aspects of memory processes, differential aspects of memory of diverse participants, and investigations of memory disorder in different developmental or aging stages with typical or atypical ability. This chapter comprises three sections. The first section provides a basic outline of memory experiments for individuals, proposed as a tetrahedral model by Jenkins (Four points to remember: a tetrahedral model of memory experiments. In: Cermak LS, Craik FIM (eds) Levels of processing in human memory. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, pp 429–446, 1979). The second section examines the four main sets of variables (participants, materials, orienting tasks, and criterial tasks) in memory experiments that most influential studies have reported. The third section discusses other sets of variables (events in the retention interval, inside and outside laboratory, and metacognitive judgments) from recent studies that require consideration. Finally, the chapter provides a concluding comment on future directions with regard to developing and refining memory experiments.

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Acknowledgments

This research was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 17 K04510.

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Correspondence to Hiroyuki Shimizu .

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Shimizu, H. (2017). Experimental Psychology Approaches to Human Memory. In: Tsukiura, T., Umeda, S. (eds) Memory in a Social Context. Springer, Tokyo. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-56591-8_1

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