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The Keys to Achieving Optimal Results

  • Damkerng Pathomvanich
Chapter

Abstract

Hair loss is inevitable for both men and women. However, with modern advancements in medication and surgical technology, there is now no need to suffer from hair loss. Hair transplantation provides the last option to regain lost hair. This chapter provides each hair transplant surgeon with the “keys” to achieve optimal results with this procedure. Patient selection, the surgeon’s experience in performing the surgery, and medications to stop further hair loss are the cornerstones to achieving good growth of hair. There is no single technique that fits all patients with hair loss. It is therefore the duty of the physician to inform the patient what technique is best for him or her to achieve good results and not allow the patient to dictate to the doctor the technique that he or she desires.

Keywords

Hair loss Experience surgeon Optimal result Good candidate Poor candidate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.DHT ClinicBangkokThailand

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