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  • Kazunari SasakiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

This chapter describes recent progress in fuel cells and hydrogen technologies, especially in Japan where real commercialization of these technologies is underway, including fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) and buses, hydrogen fueling stations, residential and industrial fuel cell systems, as well as electrolyzers for hydrogen production from renewable power. Possible ways to realize a future carbon-neutral and carbon-free energy society are discussed in this chapter.

Keywords

Fuel cell vehicles Hydrogen fueling stations Residential and industrial fuel cells Types of fuel cells Electrolyzer Social demonstration Transition to carbon-free society 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Research Center for Hydrogen EnergyKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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