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Why Hydrogen? Why Fuel Cells?

  • Kazunari SasakiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

This introductory chapter describes the reasons and motivation behind realizing a fuel cell-powered hydrogen society. After describing recent development progress in fuel cells and hydrogen technologies, possible technological, industrial, and social paradigm shifts are considered, with possible roadmaps.

Keywords

Fuel cells Hydrogen technology Electrochemical energy conversion Hydrogen-cycle Paradigm shift 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Research Center for Hydrogen EnergyKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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