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Oral Cancer pp 403-412 | Cite as

QOL Management in Oral Cancer Patients

  • Yoshihide OtaEmail author
  • Takayuki Aoki
Chapter

Abstract

In general, quality of life (QOL) in the broad sense refers to the well-being of individuals and societies. This concept covers not only physical/financial affluence, quantity of service, and individual self-care but also the spiritual aspect and self-actualization. In the medical care field, QOL influences not only the evaluation of treatment but also the treatment method. At present, concepts of values in life are diverse, and medical care considering both survival and QOL has become necessary. Therefore, QOL instruments using scales corresponding to the purpose in various areas have been developed. They have sometimes been revised because the concept of QOL varies across ages. Furthermore, QOL in oncology has characteristics different from that in other diseases. Cancer is a life-threatening disease, and many cancer patients have a mental shock when they are first notified to have cancer. QOL markedly varies before, during, and after treatment. For malignant tumors, it is significantly different depending on the stage of progression, onset site, extent of adverse events caused by treatment, and degree of residual disability. Even if a cancer survivor had a good course, QOL is often different from that before they develop cancer. Therefore, QOL evaluation in cancer patients is very difficult.

Keywords

Head and neck cancer Oral cancer QOL 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryTokai University School of MedicineIseharaJapan

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