Analysis of Service Network in Terms of the Synchronization of Body Movements During Face-to-Face Communication

  • Bujie Xu
  • Ken-ichiro Ogawa
  • Naoki Higo
  • Taiki Ogata
  • Takayuki Nozawa
  • Koji Ara
  • Kazuo Yano
  • Yoshihiro Miyake
Chapter

Abstract

This paper proposes a new approach to evaluate communities in service networks in terms of the smoothness of face-to-face communication. We use the method to analyze communities in actual six organizations. In this study, the network of each organization is divided into several communities from two different viewpoints. The first viewpoint is based on real department information, and the second one is based on the weight of face-to-face communication. We further compare the smoothness of face-to-face communication in the same community to that between different communities based on the degree of synchronization of the body movements of two persons. We find out that the community division from the first viewpoint is different from that from the second one in terms of the smoothness of face-to-face communication in a community and between communities. This indicates that good community division in service networks to enhance the quality of service could be obtained based on the smoothness of face-to-face communication.

Keywords

Body movements’ synchronization Community detection Face-to-face communication Service network 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bujie Xu
    • 1
  • Ken-ichiro Ogawa
    • 1
  • Naoki Higo
    • 1
  • Taiki Ogata
    • 2
  • Takayuki Nozawa
    • 3
  • Koji Ara
    • 4
  • Kazuo Yano
    • 4
  • Yoshihiro Miyake
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems ScienceTokyo Institute of technologyYokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Research into Artifacts, Center for EngineeringThe University of TokyoKashiwaJapan
  3. 3.Institute of Development, Aging and CancerTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  4. 4.Center Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd.TokyoJapan

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