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Ultrasound Energy Transmission for WaFLES-Support Intra-abdominal Micro Robots

  • Takuya Akagi
  • David Gomez
  • Jose Gonzalez
  • Tatsuo Igarashi
  • Wenwei Yu
Chapter
Part of the Intelligent Systems, Control and Automation: Science and Engineering book series (ISCA, volume 65)

Abstract

WaFLES (Water-Filled Laparo-Endoscopic Surgery) is a new operative procedure. However, due to the floating inner organs and tissues, the visibility would be significantly affected. WaFLES-support intra-abdominal micro robots are developed to solve this problem. This paper presents our research efforts into investigating the possibility of ultrasound energy transmission for wireless WaFLES-support intra-abdominal micro robots. A series of experiments were conducted, revealing an appropriate frequency transmission and material for the transmission units in a simulated environment.

Keywords

Piezoelectric Ultrasound Energy transmission Surgery-support Micro robots 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takuya Akagi
    • 1
  • David Gomez
    • 1
  • Jose Gonzalez
    • 2
  • Tatsuo Igarashi
    • 1
  • Wenwei Yu
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Engineering DepartmentChiba UniversityChibaJapan
  2. 2.Research Center for Frontier Medical EngineeringChiba UniversityChibaJapan

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