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Cybernics pp 289-298 | Cite as

Roboethical Arguments and Applied Ethics: Being a Good Citizen

  • Takeshi Kimura

Abstract

This chapter is designed to draw students’ attention to roboethical arguments as a part of Science, Technology, and Society (STS). They need to be aware of the political implications of various kinds of robot technology. Their good intentions in developing their technology do not automatically mean that it will turn out to be beneficial as it was designed to be. A young student in robot technology needs to learn to be a good citizen and to develop accountability.

Keywords

Roboethics Politics and robot technology Accountability Responsibility Good citizen 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Humanities and Social SciencesUniversity of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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