Sika Deer pp 83-99 | Cite as

Endocrinology of Sika Deer

  • Kiyoshi Yamauchi
  • Yukiko Matsuura

There have been few studies of endocrinology of sika deer in Japan, although several studies have been conducted on reproductive physiology. In recent years, we have obtained basic information on sika deer endocrinology by applying fecal steroid analysis as a noninvasive method. In this chapter we explore hormonal changes during the estrous cycle and pregnancy in female sika deer and in addition consider what is known about “silent” ovulation. For male sika deer, we provide the annual testosterone pattern and relate it to aggressive behavior.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiyoshi Yamauchi
    • 1
  • Yukiko Matsuura
    • 2
  1. 1.Technical Researcher, Natural Environment Laboratory, Department of Earth ScienceResearch Institute for Environmental Science and Public Health of Iwate Prefecture (I-RIEP)MoriokaJapan
  2. 2.Field Science Center for Northern BiosphereHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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