An Efficient Estimation of Light in Simulation of Plant Development

  • Bedřich Beneš
Conference paper
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

During a simulation of plant development evaluation of the amount of light plays a significant role. Most of the previous works take into account only constant amount and constant direction of the light in the scene without respect to local shadows in the tree. In the other works this evaluation strongly depends on the number of objects in the scene.

This paper introduces a new method for evaluation of amount of light for the artificial plants. This technique is based on Z-buffer algorithm and has the ability to evaluate the direction and the amount of light for every leaf in the plant with a significantly decreased time of calculation. Several new aspects of lifetime of the plant elements and of the whole plant are discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bedřich Beneš
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceCzech Technical UniversityPragueCzech Rep.

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