Computational Wind Engineering: Theory and Applications

  • Bert Blocken
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 531)

Abstract

Computational Wind Engineering (CWE) is the application of computational methods to Wind Engineering problems. While CWE is more than Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) alone, CFD has so far constituted the major part of CWE.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bert Blocken
    • 1
  1. 1.Building Physics and SystemsEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhoventhe Netherlands

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