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Projects ... Project Worlds ... Project Cultures Models of Intervention-, Cooperation-, Investigation-Based Approaches

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Abstract

≫Never before in the history of this planet≪, we learn while reading Thomas L. Friedman’s optimistic bestseller The World is Flat. A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century (Friedman, 2007), on the dawn of the digital revolution ≫could so many people find so much information on so many things and so many other persons without any outside help≪. Google had expressly set itself the radical goal of ≫making the entire knowledge of the world easily accessible to everyone in every language≪, that is to say, to make it largely possible ≫to create one’s own individual chains of value creation≪. This would trigger unknown ≫forces for leveling the world≪ — a sort of removal of barriers. Through ≫globalization of the local≪ cultural differences could be expressed in a new way. ≫Political activism and social entrepreneurialism≪ would be activated. Ultimately, everything in digitalized form — by whomever—could be ≫searched≪. These new freedoms sprung up on their own, it seems, from an ≫accumulation of events≪ consisting of boundless possibilities. In reality, though, it were the countless parallel ≫projects≪ that ultimately fed into powerful entrepreneurial structures or became such themselves.

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Reder, C. (2011). Projects ... Project Worlds ... Project Cultures Models of Intervention-, Cooperation-, Investigation-Based Approaches. In: Russegger, G., Tarasiewicz, M., Wlodkowski, M. (eds) Coded Cultures. Edition Angewandte. Springer, Vienna. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-0458-3_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-0458-3_2

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Vienna

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-7091-0457-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-7091-0458-3