Sliding Knots

  • Nuno Sevivas
  • Guilherme França
  • Nuno Oliveira
  • Nuno Ferreira
  • Manuel Vieira da Silva
  • Renato Andrade
  • João Espregueira-Mendes
Chapter

Abstract

It is well evident all around the world that endoscopic and arthroscopic techniques are still increasing its influence and prevalence in the surgical treatment of orthopedic lesions. However, open surgery still has its place in the surgical treatment of the musculoskeletal system pathology. Traumatic injuries (e.g., fractures), degenerative diseases (e.g., osteoarthrosis), and overuse injuries (e.g., tendinopathies) are still commonly treated by open means when surgery is advised. In these cases, sliding knots are technical artifices that can be very useful and helpful when performing these surgeries. Every surgeon must be familiarized with its execution, and this surgical step must be performed naturally, instinctively, and comfortably, without losing time. However, perfection and refinement of the knot’s technique are essential to not compromise the main purpose of the surgery with this final step.

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Copyright information

© ESSKA 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nuno Sevivas
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Guilherme França
    • 3
  • Nuno Oliveira
    • 3
  • Nuno Ferreira
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Manuel Vieira da Silva
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Renato Andrade
    • 4
  • João Espregueira-Mendes
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of MedicineUniversity of MinhoBragaPortugal
  2. 2.ICVS/3B’s—PT Government Associate LaboratoryBraga/GuimarãesPortugal
  3. 3.Orthopaedics DepartmentHospital de BragaBragaPortugal
  4. 4.Clínica do Dragão, Espregueira-Mendes Sports Centre—FIFA Medical Centre of ExcellencePortoPortugal
  5. 5.Orthopaedics DepartmentHospital Privado de BragaBragaPortugal
  6. 6.ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate LaboratoryBraga/GuimarãesPortugal
  7. 7.Orthopaedics Department of Minho UniversityBragaPortugal

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