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Return to Play in Stress Fractures of the Foot

  • Pieter d’HoogheEmail author
  • Athol Thomson
Chapter

Abstract

Stress fractures of the foot are rare in professional football but are known to cause long absences from the game. All bones of the lower extremity can be affected; however, load-bearing bones are more often involved in football. Navicular and fifth metatarsal bone stress fractures (in particular) show a high risk of delayed union and non-union. Recurrent submaximal loading with inadequate recovery are most likely among the major contributors; however, this chapter will also cover several other intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that should be screened. Delayed diagnosis of stress fractures of the foot can lead to unsatisfactory results. A high index of suspicion, without delay in further investigation, is mandatory. Initial treatment consists mostly of activity/load modification and rest. Early surgical intervention is indicated in case of “high-risk” fractures that are prone to displacement or non-union. This chapter will focus on the specificities of football-related foot stress fractures and show how proactive management can lead to good results and early return to play.

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Copyright information

© ESSKA 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryAspetar Orthopaedic and Sports medical Hospital, Aspire ZoneDohaQatar
  2. 2.Department of Sports PodiatryAspetar Orthopaedic and Sports medical Hospital, Aspire ZoneDohaQatar

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