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Introduction to Nanotechnology

  • Bharat Bhushan
Part of the Springer Handbooks book series (SHB)

Abstract

Nanotechnology refers to technology that is implemented at the nanoscale and has applications in the real world. Unique physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be exploited for applications that benefit society. Nanotechnology represents a megatrend and has become a general purpose technology. An executive action of 2000, the National Nanotechnology Initiative was formalized with the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act in 2003. Through FY 2015 in the United States, federal R&D investment has been about $20 billion, with annual investment in FY 2015 of about $1.5 B, and more than double that by the private sector. The revenues from nanoenabled products continue growing, with over $200 B in FY 2012 in the US alone, and over $700 B worldwide. This represents an impressive return on investment. Basic research and development as well as research on potential safety issues of nanotechnology, workforce development, and education and curriculum should be continued.

A biological system can be exceedingly small. Many of the cells are very tiny, but they are very active; they manufacture various substances; they walk around; they wiggle; and they do all kinds of marvelous things – all on a very small scale. Also, they store information. Consider the possibility that we too can make a thing very small which does what we want – that we can manufacture an object that maneuvers at that level.

R.P. Feynman: There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom. In:Annu. Meet. Am. Phys. Soc. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (1959)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bharat Bhushan
    • 1
  1. 1.Nanoprobe Lab for Bio- & Nanotechnology & BiomimeticsThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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