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Regional Pillars of Competitiveness in Chemurgy and Green Chemistry

  • Manfred KircherEmail author
Chapter
  • 648 Downloads
Part of the Green Chemistry and Sustainable Technology book series (GCST)

Abstract

The change from fossil- to bio-based chemical processing and value chains is a tremendous challenge and if done right it provides a great opportunity for established chemical clusters as well as biomass-producing regions. Both need to adapt or develop pillars of competence which determine their regional competitive position: Infrastructure, industries, science and education, public administration, public acceptance and cluster-building. While biomass regions benefit from feedstock availability, established clusters are especially strong in further processing along the value chain. Based on the example of Europe’s leading chemical cluster Antwerp–Rotterdam–Rhine–Ruhr (ARRR), a bottom-up approach into chemurgy and green chemistry is presented which combines strategies and activities on county, state, and multi-national level.

Keywords

Bio-based fuel Bio-based chemicals Bio-industry infrastructure Bio-based industries Bio-based industry research and education Bio-based industry acceptance Bio-based industry cluster Bio-based industry region 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.KADIB Kircher Advice in BioeconomyFrankfurtGermany
  2. 2.CLIB2021DüsseldorfGermany

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