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Supportive Care of Children with Cancer

  • Jane BelmoreEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Over the past four decades there have been major advances in the treatment strategies for childhood cancers, and many professional disciplines are involved in the child and family’s care. Children with cancer have a right to achieve their potential, both during their treatment and in laying foundations for their future. However, the diagnosis of cancer in childhood has a huge impact on the child, their family and the wider social circle.

Despite the advances in the treatment of childhood cancer, approximately 30 % of children suffering from cancer in the UK still die as a result of their illness and will require a purely palliative approach to care.

Keywords

Childhood cancer Treatment Multidisciplinary Care Communication Side-effects Family Symptoms Palliative Support 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Schiehallon Unit/Ward 2ARoyal Hospital for ChildrenGlasgowScotland, UK

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