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Abstract

This chapter outlines sedatives and anxiolytic agents commonly used and administered orally to sedate children for dental procedures. The salient features of nitrous oxide, chloral hydrate, meperidine, midazolam, antihistamines, and ketamine are discussed in relation to sedating children for dental procedures. Nitrous oxide is most frequently used and can be administered alone or with the other agents. Midazolam is the most frequently used oral sedative in children. Most of these agents can be used in various combinations when sedating children; however, caution must be taken when using two or more of these agents at a single appointment to decrease the likelihood of adverse events. Summary tables of the drug characteristics are also provided.

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Correspondence to Stephen Wilson DMD, MA, PhD .

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© 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Ganzberg, S.I., Wilson, S. (2015). Sedative and Anxiolytic Agents. In: Wilson, S. (eds) Oral Sedation for Dental Procedures in Children. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-46626-1_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-46626-1_4

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-662-46625-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-662-46626-1

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