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Multiple Ulcers Closed by Multiple Flaps as a Single Procedure

  • Salah Rubayi
Chapter

Abstract

In clinical practice, it is common to evaluate a patient with multiple stage IV ulcers. Multiple ulcers are defined as clinical manifestations of more than two pressure ulcers. Patients with multiple ulcers commonly have a primary diagnosis of insensate secondary to spinal cord injury or advanced neurologic disease. The plastic surgeon with limited exposure in this field faces a challenge in the approach to repairing these ulcers, whether to close one or two ulcers at a time or all at one time. The choice depends on experience and the exposure in this field. For this reason, the author considers this subject important, and the plastic surgeon requires exposure to the concept of management of multiple ulcers in one stage. In this chapter, the discussion focuses mainly on the advantages and disadvantages of this practice based on a review of the literature and the author’s experience in this surgical practice.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Pressure Ulcer Plastic Surgeon Urinary Diversion Vastus Lateralis Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Tizian C, Brenner P, Berger A (1988) The one-stage surgical treatment of multilocated pressure sores using various myocutaneous island flaps. Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg 22:83CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lari AR, Rajacic N (1992) One-stage repair of multiple bed sores. Br J Plast Surg 45:540CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rubayi S, Burnett CC (1999) The efficacy of single-stage surgical management of multiple pressure sores in spinal cord injured patients. Ann Plast Surg 42:533CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SurgeryRancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation CenterDowneyUSA
  2. 2.Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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