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Research on the Influence of Traffic Conditions on the Psychology of Indirect Vision Drivers Based on EEG Analysis

  • Zhiying Qiu
  • Zhicheng Wu
  • Jingjie Wu
  • Jie Bao
  • Jia Zhou
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 318)

Abstract

Numbers of studies have shown that electroencephalogram (EEG) signals can objectively reflect the physiological and mental state of a human being. In order to explore the influence of traffic conditions on the indirect vision drivers’ EEG, we asked the volunteer drivers to drive a car equipped with indirect vision driving system around the test loop for 3 times and collected the drivers’ EEG signals in real time. Meanwhile, a driving video recorder equipped on the windshield was used to record the traffic conditions of every lap. Contrasting the videos of traffic conditions, the changes of EEGs were analyzed. The result shows that the average attentions of indirect vision the driver driving on the curve lanes and when the vehicle starts to move or stops to run are higher than driving on the straight section, and the transient attention of the indirect vision driver appears peaks when meeting another vehicle, bike, and pedestrian. It means that complex traffic conditions and operant tasks could make indirect vision driver’s psychology burden heavier.

Keywords

Experiment Indirect vision driving Different traffic conditions EEG Changes 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhiying Qiu
    • 1
  • Zhicheng Wu
    • 1
  • Jingjie Wu
    • 1
  • Jie Bao
    • 1
  • Jia Zhou
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringBeijing Institute of TechnologyBeijingChina

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