Skip to main content

Activity Theory as a Design Framework for Collaborative Learning Using Google Applications Technology

  • Conference paper
New Horizons in Web Based Learning (ICWL 2012)

Part of the book series: Lecture Notes in Computer Science ((LNISA,volume 7697))

Included in the following conference series:

Abstract

Collaborative learning involves small groups of students working together to solve problems for the purpose of learning. A large number of studies have focused on the technical aspects of computer-mediated environments for collaborative learning. This research distinguishes from other studies by employing a social learning approach. In this research, activity theory was used as a design framework for collaborative learning in a Web 2.0 environment using Google Applications technology. By employing an activity-oriented design method, a collaborative platform was developed to facilitate social learning activities that are mediated by artifacts and collaborative tools using the Google Applications environment.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 39.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 54.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  1. Cheung, R., Vogel, D.: Designing Web 2.0 collaboration tools to support project-based learning: An activity-oriented approach. International Journal of Systems and Service-Oriented Engineering 3(2), 1–14 (2012)

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Christensen, C.M., Horn, M., Johnson, C.: Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns. McGraw Hill, NY (2008)

    Google Scholar 

  3. Engeström, Y.: Learning by expanding: An activity-theoretical approach to developmental research. Orienta-Konsultit Oy, Helsinki (1987)

    Google Scholar 

  4. Engeström, Y.: Developmental studies of work as a testbench of activity theory: The case of primary care medical practice. In: Chaiklin, S., Lave, J. (eds.) Understanding Practice, pp. 64–103. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1993)

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  5. Engeström, Y.: Activity theory and individual and social transformation. In: Engeström, Y., Miettinen, R., Punamaki, R. (eds.) Perspectives on Activity Theory, pp. 19–38. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1999)

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  6. Lampe, C., Ellison, N., Steinfield, C.: A Face(book) in the Crowd: Social Searching vs. Social Browsing. In: Proceedings of the 20th Anniversary Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work. ACM, Banff (2006)

    Google Scholar 

  7. Mwanza, D.: Conceptualising work activity for CAL systems design. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 18(1), 84–92 (2002)

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Ng, P., Cheung, R.: Predicting Online Purchase Intentions for Taobao.com. In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Internet Technologies & Society, China (2011)

    Google Scholar 

  9. Nardi, B.A.: Context and consciousness: Activity theory and human–computer interaction. MIT Press, Cambridge (1996)

    Google Scholar 

  10. Rienzo, T., Han, B.: Microsoft or Google Web 2.0 Tools for Course Management. Journal of Information Systems 20(2), 123–127 (2009)

    Google Scholar 

  11. Stahl, G., Koschmann, T., Suthers, D.: Computer-supported collaborative learning: An historical perspective. In: Sawyer, R.K. (ed.) The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences, pp. 409–425. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (2006)

    Google Scholar 

  12. Vygotsky, L.S.: Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Harvard University Press, Cambridge (1978)

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

About this paper

Cite this paper

Cheung, R., Vogel, D. (2014). Activity Theory as a Design Framework for Collaborative Learning Using Google Applications Technology. In: Chiu, D.K.W., Wang, M., Popescu, E., Li, Q., Lau, R. (eds) New Horizons in Web Based Learning. ICWL 2012. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 7697. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-43454-3_15

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-43454-3_15

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-662-43453-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-662-43454-3

  • eBook Packages: Computer ScienceComputer Science (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics