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Antibiotics pp 494-498 | Cite as

Tubercidin and Related Pyrrolopyrimidine Antibiotics

  • George Acs
  • Edward Reich

Abstract

The pyrrolopyrimidine ribosides constitute a newly characterized class of cytotoxic nucleoside antibiotics. Because their discovery and the elucidation of their structure have occurred so recently, relatively little information concerning the biological properties of these interesting compounds has accumulated. This article summarizes briefly some exploratory experiments on the metabolism and mode of action of the pyrrolopyrimidine antibiotics. Tubercidin was discovered in Japan by Anzai et al. (1957) and its structure was established by Suzuki and Marumo (1961 a and b). It is produced by Streptomyces tubercidicus. The discovery and characterization of toyocamycin and sangivamycin are described by Nishimura et al. (1956) and by Rao (1963). Tubercidin inhibits the growth of several microorganisms including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is toxic to many vertebrate species, and is powerfully cytotoxic to vertebrate cell lines in culture (Anzai et al., 1957; Acs et al., 1964; Owen et al., 1964).

Keywords

Adenine Nucleotide Mouse Fibroblast Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cell Adenosine Kinase Ehrlich Ascites Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Acs
  • Edward Reich

There are no affiliations available

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