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Antibiotics pp 446-450 | Cite as

Chalcomycin

  • D. C. Jordan

Abstract

Chalcomycin, is a fermentation product of a culture of Streptomyces now regarded as a new strain of Streptomyces bikiniensis. This organism differs from the description of S. bikiniensis given by Johnstone and Waksman (1948) in that it produces chalcomycin; has oblong spores; produces no soluble pigment in Czapek’s agar and produces a dark grey pigment, instead of a dark brown pigment, in nutrient agar (Coffey et al., 1965). Two different isolates of this strain are maintained by Parke, Davis and Company (05020 and 05071) and by the Northern Utilization Research and Development Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois (NRRL 2737 and NRRL 2738).

Keywords

Utilization Research Soluble Pigment Corynebacterium Diphtheriae Lancefield Group Northern Utilization Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. C. Jordan

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