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Operational Features of the Cerebellar Cortex

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Abstract

After the histological information presented in Chapters I and II and the additional details in Chapters III, IV, VI, VII and IX, it will be necessary to give only a brief summary mainly of the geometry of the connexions established over the various chains. While doing so, it is desirable to start with the neurone chains activated by the mossy fiber input because these have such complex and also such extended relations to the neuronal network of the cerebellar cortex.

Keywords

Purkinje Cell Granule Cell Cerebellar Cortex Mossy Fiber Parallel Fiber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Biomedical ResearchAmerican Medical Association, Education and Research FoundationChicagoUSA
  2. 2.University of TokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy University Medical SchoolBudapest, IX.Hungary

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